Falaise – My Endless Immensity (Review)

FalaiseThis is the second album from Falaise, a black metal band from Italy.

A very much enjoyed the band’s debut album As Time Goes By, which was an hour of enjoyable blackgaze melancholy, with dark atmosphere and depressive moods. Continue reading

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Orbseven – Cosmos out of Chaos (Review)

OrbsevenOrbseven is a one-man post-black metal band from the US and this is his fourth album.

2014’s .ismos. was a creative and novel album that took various aspects of avant-garde, experimental, and post-black metal and forged them into something quite enjoyable and satisfying. Continue reading

Faunus – Where Everything Begins with an End (Review)

FaunusFaunus is a one-man Greek black metal band and this is his debut album.

This is atmospheric black metal, with long songs that are inspired by the natural world. Each track is dedicated to a season and has its own atmosphere and character dedicated to exploring this theme; the artist seems to have gone to great lengths in an attempt Continue reading

Interview with Haze of Summer

Haze of Summer Logo

Haze of Summer’s debut album Znoi is a refreshing take on the current over-saturation of the worldwide black metal scene. This is an album that revels in corrupting black metal’s dark, grim base with lighter, summery moments, all the while staying surprisingly true to the originating style, while also going its own way down post-black metal pathways.

Do you know what? It works a treat, and Znoi is an extremely enjoyable listen.

Intrigued, and wanting to learn more about this enigmatic project, I caught up with the head man behind the band… Continue reading

White Ward – Futility Report (Review)

White WardThis is the debut album from White Ward, a Ukrainian post-black metal band.

This is post-black metal with avant-garde tendencies. However, this is a very simplistic description of what you’ll find on Futility Report; the music is anything but simple.

Mix Ihsahn, Ulver, Ephel Duath, Blut Aus Nord, Deafheaven, and Wolves in the Throne Room together, and you’ll still only have the barest glimpse of what White Ward play. Continue reading