Natt – Natt (Review)

Natt - NattThis is the debut album from Natt, a Norwegian progressive/post-rock/doom band.

Natt contains just three songs, with 45 minutes of music. They’re an instrumental duo, although they’re joined on this recording by session musicians on bass and drums/percussion, (the latter from Enslaved). I’m not normally drawn to instrumental music, but one look at the strangely disturbing album artwork made me want to hear this work, and I’m so glad it did. Continue reading “Natt – Natt (Review)”

Leipa – Reue (Review)

Leipa - ReueThis is the second album from German one-man black metal act Leipa.

Containing 39 minutes of material, Reue is fast and sharp, (although not exclusively so), offering black metal that’s melodic and well-written. The artist behind Leipa has a clear vision for his music, and has more than enough talent to realise it. Continue reading “Leipa – Reue (Review)”

Iravu – A Fate Worse Than Home (Review)

Iravu - A Fate Worse Than HomeThis is the debut album from Malaysian one-man black metal band Iravu.

A Fate Worse Than Home contains 34 minutes of expressive, cosmic black metal. Mixing the atmospheric, ambient, and progressive styles into an engaging whole, the artist behind Iravu has crafted something quite special here. Continue reading “Iravu – A Fate Worse Than Home (Review)”

Gorycz – Kamienie (Review)

Gorycz - KamienieGorycz are a Polish post-black metal band and this is their second album.

Gorycz feature members of Non Opus Dei, and Kamienie is a 37-minute exploration of non-standard music. Stirring together ingredients from black metal, post-rock, and sludge into a tasty post-black metal cocktail, Gorycz’s music is individual and Continue reading “Gorycz – Kamienie (Review)”

Firtan – Marter (Review)

Firtan - MarterFirtan are a German black metal band and this is their third album.

Marter offers a 58-minute feast of expressive atmospheric black metal. Richly anointed with post-rock detail and progressive depth, this is an album of impeccable taste and commanding presence. Continue reading “Firtan – Marter (Review)”