Ashbringer – Absolution (Review)

Ashbringer - AbsolutionAshbringer are an atmospheric black metal band from the US and this is their third album.

Ashbringer’s black metal combines aggressive blackness with melodic sensibilities and folk-influenced post-rock reflection. Elements of bands such as Fen, Agalloch, Falls of Rauros, Amiensus, and Alcest can be heard, but moulded and channelled through Ashbringer’s own collective experiences and personality. Continue reading

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Murk Rider – Exile of Shadows (Review)

Murk Rider - Exile of ShadowsThis is the debut album from US black metal band Murk Rider.

Three enormous songs, with a combined duration of 82 minutes? Okay, I’ll bite.

An album of depth, both musically and thematically, Exile of Shadows is black metal in only one of its aspects, albeit a primary one. The band also occasionally incorporate apocalyptic sludge and stoner doom into their melting pot, as well as strands of classic heavy and speed metal. This curious, (yet effective), mixture means that Continue reading

Morrow – The Weight of These Feathers (Review)

MorrowMorrow are a US black metal band and this is their debut album.

Not to be confused with the Morrow from the UK that have appeared on this site previously, this US band play atmospheric black metal with ambient and post-rock influences. Continue reading

Apotelesma – Timewrought Kings (Review)

ApotelesmaApotelesma are a doom metal band from the Netherlands and this is their debut album.

This is dark, atmospheric doom metal that has several corrupting influences from black metal’s more atmospheric strains. Continue reading

Fragarak – A Spectral Oblivion (Review)

FragarakFragarak are an Indian progressive death metal band and this is their second album.

We first met Fragarak on their 2013 album Crypts of Dissimulation. Well, we’ve been waiting a long time for a follow up release, and now it’s here, it’s quite the monster. Continue reading

Ne Obliviscaris – Urn (Review)

Ne ObliviscarisNe Obliviscaris are an Australian progressive extreme metal band and this is their third album.

Urn is epic, progressive, aggressive, and textured. It’s a release that has a lot to absorb and experience, requiring multiple sittings to really even start to get the most from it. This is a complex and emotive listen, one that’s highly rewarding and enjoyable. Continue reading

Iapetus – The Long Road Home (Review)

IapetusThis is the debut album from Iapetus, a progressive death metal band from the US.

Okay, here we have – deep breath – atmospheric, progressive, melodic death metal. Well, that wasn’t so bad, actually. Continue reading

Crystalmoors – The Mountain Will Forgive Us (Review)

CrystalmoorsCrystalmoors are a Spanish pagan/folk black metal band and this is their third album.

This is a double-album release consisting of two different parts. The first is named The Sap That Feeds Us and the second is named La Montaña.

The Sap That Feeds Us is pagan/folk black metal that should find fans in any that favour the work of Dissection, Primordial, Agalloch and Drudkh.

I like the blackened Continue reading

Falloch – This Island, Our Funeral (Review)

FallochFalloch are from the UK, and this is their second album. They play Folk-tinged Post-Rock.

This is the kind of album you’d listen to when trying to relax at the end of a hard day, or when you want something light and non-invasive to tinkle away in the background.

Falloch specialise in nature-inspired songs that take the slow route and utilise the build/release nature of Post-Rock to carve out their ethereal sounds.

This Island, Our Funeral is somewhat of a mix of bands such as Agalloch, Anathema and Blueneck only with more of a Post-Rock style and an elemental, windswept feel.

Guitar melodies and leads conjure images akin to the album cover and the organic production has some steel to it despite the nature of the music.

The vocals are well-performed with layered harmonies and angelic tones. The singer’s voice is well judged and fits the music well; it shares the same Folk-edge that the music does and the vocal melodies seep out of the speakers like honey.

Falloch have crafted an album that attempts to forge an emotional connection with the listener and its success largely depends on how receptive the listener is to what they have to say. They clearly believe in what they’re doing and I think they’re definitely worth a listen or two. Have at it.