Self-Hatred – Hlubiny (Review)

Self-HatredSelf-Hatred are from the Czech Republic and this is their second album. They play death/doom metal.

Hlubiny is the follow up to 2016’s very enjoyable Theia, which I really liked for its contemporary take on the death/doom style. On Hlubiny the band have continued to develop and refine their sound, resulting in 42 minutes of material that sees them at their towering, monolithic best. Continue reading

Khemmis – Desolation (Review)

KhemmisKhemmis are a doom metal band from the US and this is their third album.

Well, this is one that’s been quite hotly anticipated. Due to how ridiculously strong both Absolution and Hunted were, I had very high hopes for Desolation. Obviously, due to this intro blurb, I have not been disappointed. Desolation is a monster. Continue reading

Interview with Abstracter

Abstracter Logo

The latest Abstracter album – Cinereous Incarnate – is a twisted, blackened work of dark art. In my humble opinion it’s the band’s best work to date, and I heavily recommend that you grab it when it’s released on Friday of this week.

Without any further preamble, have a look at the interview with the band below. If that doesn’t further convince you to check out Cinereous Incarnate, then the stream at the bottom hopefully will. Bring on the end times! Continue reading

Monthly Overview – the Best of May 2018

So, every month I say something along the lines of “this month has been a strong month for metal, blah, blah, blah…”, but May really has been a ridiculously strong month for metal! I really have struggled to keep this list down to manageable levels this time, and removed a few potential entries simply to keep the numbers down, (I’m not happy about this). So anyway, in no particular order, I give you my top picks for May 2018… Continue reading

Bodies on Everest – A National Day of Mourning (Review)

Bodies on EverestBodies on Everest are from the UK and this is their second album. They play noise/sludge/doom/drone.

Noise/sludge/doom/drone you say? Yep, with A National Day of Mourning Bodies on Everest combine these elements into an ugly monster of an album. Across 66 minutes of disturbed, warped material, the band bring their twisted nighmarescapes to terrifying life. Continue reading