Horror God/Techne – Split (Review)

Horror God TechneHorror God and Techne are both Russian death metal bands and this is their split release.

Horror God offer up four songs lasting 19 minutes in total; three originals and a Purulence cover. Continue reading

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Eccentric Pendulum – Tellurian Concepts (Review)

Eccentric PendulumThis is the latest EP from Indian progressive death metal band Eccentric Pendulum.

Featuring the vocalist of Gutslit and Godless, Eccentric Pendulum is a different affair to those worthy death metal bands.  Continue reading

Exist – So True, So Bound (Review)

ExistExist are a progressive/technical death metal band from the US and this is their second album.

Exist have taken the torch from forerunners such as Atheist, Death, and Cynic, and are truly running with it. This means we get an old-school influenced version of the progressive/technical death metal style, as laid down by the aforementioned masters, despite the modern veneer and sparkling production. Continue reading

Moss upon the Skull – The Scourge of Ages (Review)

Moss upon the SkullMoss upon the Skull are a death metal band from Belgium and this is their debut EP.

This is atypical progressive death metal. This is the type of band that are great to hear.

Rather than sticking to the standard genre tropes, they have decided to play death metal their own way on their own terms. Continue reading

Nova Collective – The Further Side (Review)

Nova CollectiveNova Collective are a US/UK progressive rock band and this is their debut album.

Featuring members of Between the Buried and Me, Haken, Trioscapes and Cynic, Nova Collective’s debut album The Further Side is 48 minutes of instrumental progressive rock fusion with plenty of jazz, world and classical influences. Continue reading

Vipassi – Śūnyatā (Review)

VipassiThis is the debut album from Australian instrumental metal band Vipassi.

Śūnyatā is 30 minutes of instrumental music that combines elements of progressive, technical and death metal together to form an engaging and thoughtful listening experience.

Atheist, Cynic and Death are the Continue reading

Stench Price – Self Titled (Review)

Stench PriceStench Price are a grindcore supergroup and this is their debut release.

There’s a bewildering array of talent and people involved in this, so I’m simply going to copy and paste the lineup from the press blurb to make things easier for myself –

France – Romain Goulon – Drums (Necrophagist, Disavowed, etc.)
Siberia – Peter Shallmin – Bass (Escapethecult, Kamlath)
Siberia – Max Konstantinov – Guitars (Kamlath, Nebesniesnami)
USA – Danny Lilker (Brutal Truth, Nuclear Assault, SOD, etc.)
Sweden – Rogga Johansson (Paganizer, Demiurg, etc.)
USA – Max Phelps (Cynic, Death DTA Tours, Exist)
UK – Dave Ingram (Hail of Bullets, Benediction, Bolt Thrower, etc.)
Australia – Karina Utomo (High Tension)
USA – Shawn Knight (Child Bite) Continue reading

Job for a Cowboy – Sun Eater (Review)

Job for a CowboyJob for a Cowboy are a US Death Metal band and this is their fourth album.

On this release Job for a Cowboy have refined their Death Metal further, adding a progressive sheen to their technical assault. Ambitious and bold, this is a game-changing release for the band in many ways, demonstrating that they are willing to do what it takes to reinvent themselves on their own terms.

The solid and modern Death Metal core of the band remains, but on Sun Eater this is complemented by additional ideas and different flourishes to what they have tried before, including nicely wandering basslines and progressive Metal explorations that truly flesh out their sound more than in the past. On Sun Eater it seems they have really pushed the envelope with their experimentation.

It’s really good to see a band that are not content to stay the same with every release; while still retaining their own identity the band have moved forwards with their style and embraced a more Death/Cynic aspect in addition to what they have previously done. This enhanced songwriting is apparent throughout this album.

The songs are complex, varied, layered and have a lot going on. Entwined melodies and eccentric grooves create all manner of intriguing soundscapes. The bass, which is always something I love to hear, is a major player in the band’s updated sound.

Note should also be made of their singer. Although he’s always had a charismatic growl, his performance on Sun Eater is probably his most diverse and enjoyable yet, with his growls and screams being flawlessly delivered and well-judged. His engaging vocal rhythms remain intact, even though the music has morphed and mutated around them.

Due to the above, Sun Eater offers less instant gratification than its predecessors, but repeated spins shows this to be a positive thing as the album grows on you like a plague, (in a good way).

Having successfully fully transitioned to this new progressive Death Metal style, this album is hugely impressive.

For fans of Obscura, Gorguts and the like, this is damn near essential.

Contrarian – Polemic (Review)

ContrarianContrarian are a Progressive Death Metal band from the US. This is their début album.

Just take a look at the album cover – there’s a lot going on and this translates to the music on Polemic too. Contrarian play distinctly atypical Progressive/Technical Death Metal. It’s not your standard fare. which we are eternally grateful for. As a soundtrack to space battles, it works.

Elements of Death, Atheist and Cynic can be heard, as well as more modern influences. All of this is held together by a first-rate vocalist whose growls can only be described as monstrous.

The music twists and turns, taking the listener down all manner of interesting avenues before seemingly changing direction on a whim, returning to where it left off only to find that it’s not the same place after all.

So the band can play, that much is clear; you would expect no less considering the pedigree of some of the members, (Nile being the most notable). Interestingly though, even through all of the technicality and forensic playing they still somehow manage to fashion this chaotic landscape into a collection of songs.

There’s a good helping of otherworldly melodies and distorted atmospherics included in the mix too. These are a welcome addition to the band’s music, helping to create an additional sense of depth and longevity to the tracks. There are frequent calmer sections peppered throughout, as if the band are allowing themselves small moments of respite and self-reflection to replenish themselves for what’s to come.

In the final analysis, it all results in a highly-textured release that is a very enjoyable listen.

Highly recommended.