Monthly Overview – the Best of June 2020

No preamble this month, let’s just get right down to it… Continue reading

Exocrine – Maelstrom (Review)

Exocrine - MaelstromThis is the fourth album from French death metallers Exocrine.

Here we have a 42-minute blast of technical death metal. Modern in style and feel, with various progressive and melodic elements, Maelstrom makes a good impression. A very, very good impression. Repeated spins only cements this. I enjoyed 2018’s Molten Giant, but this is superior. Continue reading

Aversions Crown – Hell Will Come for Us All (Review)

Aversions Crown - Hell Will Come for Us AllThis is the fourth album from Aversions Crown, a death metal/deathcore band from Australia.

2016’s Xenocide was an exemplar of modern brutality, with its alien melodies and extraterrestrial themes. Hell Will Come for Us All is a different beast; although still recognisably the same band in some respects, the Aversions Crown of 2020 is more grounded in the present, with a corresponding increase in brutally destructive heaviness, and a sound more reminiscent of some of their peers. Continue reading

Symbolik – Emergence (Review)

Symbolik - EmergenceSymbolik are a death metal band from the US and this is their debut album.

Symbolik’s brand of death metal is a modern mix of the technical and the melodic. Across 39 minutes of material the band take the listener down pathways of bright melody and sharp aggression. Continue reading

Viscera – Obsidian (Review)

Viscera - ObsidianViscera are a deathcore band from the UK and this is their debut album.

Featuring ex-members of Sylosis, Heart of a Coward, Martyr Defiled, Nervecell, Surfaces, and Abhorrent Decimation, Obsidian contains 36 minutes of modern brutality. Continue reading

Fit for an Autopsy – The Sea of Tragic Beasts (Review)

Fit for an Autopsy - The Sea of Tragic BeastsFit for an Autopsy are a deathcore band from the US and this is their fifth album.

This album follows on from 2017’s hugely enjoyable The Great Collapse, which stood tall and proud as an example of deathcore that took influence from the original parameters of the genre, but had also progressed beyond it. The Sea of Tragic Beasts finds the band continuing down their chosen path, merging deathcore ferocity with post-deathcore progressive atmospherics and emotional content. Continue reading