Hanging the Nihilist – Prophetic Blasphemy (Review)

Hanging the Nihilist - Prophetic BlasphemyHanging the Nihilist are a blackened deathcore band from Denmark and this is their debut album.

Prophetic Blasphemy contains 42 minutes of brutal modern blackened deathcore. Riven with huge breakdowns and enhanced with blackened malevolence, Prophetic Blasphemy is on the darker, heavier side of the deathcore spectrum, and I like what I hear. Continue reading “Hanging the Nihilist – Prophetic Blasphemy (Review)”

Sensory Amusia – Breed Death (Review)

Sensory Amusia - Breed DeathSensory Amusia are an Australian death metal band and this is their second album.

I was impressed by Sensory Amusia’s 2020 EP Bereavement, so I definitely wanted to check out whatever they did next. This turned out to be Breed Death, which scratches my modern death metal itch very nicely indeed. Continue reading “Sensory Amusia – Breed Death (Review)”

Abiotic – Ikigai (Review)

Abiotic - IkigaiThis is the third album from US death metallers Abiotic.

Abiotic play modern death metal that takes influence from the technical and progressive strains of the style, as well as from some elements of deathcore. The promo blurb states that Ikiagi is for fans of bands such as Continue reading “Abiotic – Ikigai (Review)”

Sensory Amusia – Bereavement (Review)

Sensory Amusia - BereavementSensory Amusia are an Australian death metal band and this is their latest EP.

Prepare for 17 minutes of mayhem and carnage! Sensory Amusia play modern death metal smashed together with crushing deathcore and savage grind. The end result is a very engaging slice of ferocity, and is a tasty treat of technical deathgrind bliss. Continue reading “Sensory Amusia – Bereavement (Review)”

Ahtme – Sewerborn (Review)

AhtmeAhtme, (formerly The Roman Holiday), are a death metal band from the US and this is their second album.

I like death metal that combines technical playing with devastating riffs, a meaty production, and a singer that can growl with the best of them. Which is why I like Sewerborn very much. Containing a raging concoction of surprisingly charismatic brutality, as you listen to this it becomes quickly apparent that Ahtme know how to write a good song. Continue reading “Ahtme – Sewerborn (Review)”

Dyscarnate – With All Their Might (Review)

DyscarnateDyscarnate are a UK death metal band and this is their third album.

Dyscarnate play heavy, modern, aggressive death metal. With All Their Might in general can probably be described in a cursory fashion as a mix of Deicide, Job for a Cowboy, Kataklysm, and Decapitated, although this is only a starting point and there’s a lot more to this album than this might lead you to believe. Continue reading “Dyscarnate – With All Their Might (Review)”

Maou Mindu – Grind Against Humanity (Review)

Maou MinduMaou Mindu are a deathgrind band from Canada and this is their debut EP.

Gotta love deathgrind. Taking the direct, lethal assault of grindcore and combining it with the extra depth that death metal can allow, it frequently marries the two together in strong and sexy ways. In the case of Maou Mindu, the results are very sexy indeed. Continue reading “Maou Mindu – Grind Against Humanity (Review)”

Hybrid Sheep – Hail to the Beast (Review)

Hybrid SheepThis is the second album from French death metal band Hybrid Sheep.

After the promise shown on 2014’s Free from the Clutches of Gods, Hybrid Sheep have now returned with another instalment of their modern death metal, and have showed some nice progress since their first opening release. Continue reading “Hybrid Sheep – Hail to the Beast (Review)”

Job for a Cowboy – Sun Eater (Review)

Job for a CowboyJob for a Cowboy are a US Death Metal band and this is their fourth album.

On this release Job for a Cowboy have refined their Death Metal further, adding a progressive sheen to their technical assault. Ambitious and bold, this is a game-changing release for the band in many ways, demonstrating that they are willing to do what it takes to reinvent themselves on their own terms.

The solid and modern Death Metal core of the band remains, but on Sun Eater this is complemented by additional ideas and different flourishes to what they have tried before, including nicely wandering basslines and progressive Metal explorations that truly flesh out their sound more than in the past. On Sun Eater it seems they have really pushed the envelope with their experimentation.

It’s really good to see a band that are not content to stay the same with every release; while still retaining their own identity the band have moved forwards with their style and embraced a more Death/Cynic aspect in addition to what they have previously done. This enhanced songwriting is apparent throughout this album.

The songs are complex, varied, layered and have a lot going on. Entwined melodies and eccentric grooves create all manner of intriguing soundscapes. The bass, which is always something I love to hear, is a major player in the band’s updated sound.

Note should also be made of their singer. Although he’s always had a charismatic growl, his performance on Sun Eater is probably his most diverse and enjoyable yet, with his growls and screams being flawlessly delivered and well-judged. His engaging vocal rhythms remain intact, even though the music has morphed and mutated around them.

Due to the above, Sun Eater offers less instant gratification than its predecessors, but repeated spins shows this to be a positive thing as the album grows on you like a plague, (in a good way).

Having successfully fully transitioned to this new progressive Death Metal style, this album is hugely impressive.

For fans of Obscura, Gorguts and the like, this is damn near essential.

Ferium – Behind the Black Eyes (Review)

FeriumThis is the second album from Israeli Death/Groove Metal band Ferium.

Ferium’s début album Reflections was a lively and enjoyable album that mixed Death and Groove Metal in just the right amounts.

The first thing about Behind the Black Eyes that strikes me is that it’s a far more focused effort than their début; the total playing time, total number of songs and individual track lengths have all been pruned, showing a band who have gained experience in the last few years and have trimmed away the fat to leave a lean, aggressive Metal machine.

The band essentially employ the same format as they did previously – heavy riffs and groovy beats interspersed with elements of modern Metalcore and underscored by a Death Metal base – but this time it’s tighter and more direct. That’s not to say there’s no depth of songwriting here, rather, the band are now closer to the style they clearly want to play and are playing it as they know how best to do; with angry brutality and poised aggression.

The singer growls and barks his way through the tracks. He seems to have improved on his already very satisfactory earlier performance and on this latest release appears to have settled into his role even more comfortably than previously. His voice is quite versatile, with his many different vocalisations all intent on maximising aggression.

All of the songs are well written and demonstrate a band coming into their own. Interesting and nuanced riffs rub shoulders with simpler bruisers, resulting in satisfying songs that may take a direct approach but provide enough content so as to be worth returning to over time.

Well, Reflections was good, but this is better. Well done Ferium.

Highly recommended for fans of Whitechapel, Gojira, Lamb of God, Job for a Cowboy, Thy Art Is Murder, Meshuggah, etc.