Minor/Minor – Minor/Minor (Review)

Minor MinorThis is the debut album from Belgian rockers Minor/Minor.

Minor/Minor play modern, emotive rock that takes influence from a few different places. Think a mix of bands like Arcane Roots, Pink Floyd, Coheed and Cambria, Cave In, Filter, and Radiohead as starting points, maybe. Continue reading

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The Restitution – Into the Dark (Review)

The RestitutionThe Restitution is a one-man progressive metal band from the US and this is his second album.

2013’s Waves was a very enjoyable and impressive release, and I can’t believe it’s been four years since it came out. Continue reading

Slug Comparison – IIa (Review)

Slug ComparisonThis is the latest EP from Slug Comparison, a one-man Canadian progressive rock band.

Slug Comparison’s self-titled debut album, was a very enjoyable and well-realised 41 minutes of modern rock. It reminded me of a mix of elements of bands like Radiohead, Nine Inch Nails, Steven Wilson, and Sunna. Continue reading

Slug Comparison – Slug Comparison (Review)

Slug ComparisonThis is the début album of Slug Comparison, a Canadian Progressive Rock band.

Actually a solo album with guest/session musicians, Slug Comparison contains 41 minutes of modern Progressive Rock.

This reminds me of early 00s band Sunna mixed with elements of Radiohead, Nine Inch Nails and something like Steven Wilson. It’s extremely accomplished and very well realised.

The songs on this album are diverse and professional, with dark themes and a quasi-Industrial/Electronica feel to them on occasion; synths and electronic effects are frequent accompaniments to the standard instruments. These are used well to add extra flavour to an already tasty feast.

The singer’s voice has a contemporary feel to it and has a raw presence and charisma that money couldn’t buy. He has good range and deals with all of the challenges the material offers him with zeal and skill.

There’s a lot to be absorbed here, and repeated spins reveal the depth of nuance that these songs have to offer. It’s clear that a lot of work and effort has gone into this album, and it pays off spectacularly.

I have no qualms at all about highly recommending this album for your aural delectation. There’s a wealth of talent and expertise on display here, and it’s well worth the taking the time to explore it.

Code – Mut (Review)

CodeCode are from the UK and this is their fourth album.

It seems that Code have undergone somewhat of a transformation since 2013’s Augur Nox; gone is the Avant-Garde Black Metal, instead being replaced with Progressive Post-Rock.

Their new incarnation is akin to a cross between Red Sparowes, Anathema, Autumnblaze, Green Carnation and Radiohead to my ears. It’s a change in style that seems to suit the band as it sounds like a natural fit.

The music is stripped back but expressive and emotive nonetheless. The relatively short songs contain a lot of content in a short space of time; one would almost expect music of this nature to be double the length but most of the tracks here are about  3-4 minutes in duration.

The vocals are similar in style to their past versions, albeit less extravagant and with greater fragility. His voice has an internal power to it though that again reminds of the singers of Anathema and Autumnblaze.

The songs seem to tell a story and pull the listener into their world. The soundscapes Code create are involving and forbidding; they’ve managed to create a sense of carnival-esque awe and wonder for the listener to explore through Post-Rock textures and Progressive Rock workouts.

I applaud the band for their willingness to update their sound, and although I will miss their past style they’ve amply proven to me with Mut that they continue to create rich and engaging music.

A triumph.