Slow – VI – Dantalion (Review)

Slow - VI - DantalionSlow is a funeral doom band from Belgium and this is their sixth album.

2017’s V – Oceans was a monolithic slab of atmospheric funeral doom that I really, really enjoyed. Brought to us by the artist behind bands such as We All Die (Laughing), COAG, Merda Mundi, Cult of Erinyes, and many others, Slow has now been expanded to a duo, which seems to have inspired them to produce an absolute monster of an album – here they give us 78 minutes of content to become transfixed by. Continue reading

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Convocation – Scars Across (Review)

ConvocationConvocation are from Finland and play atmospheric death/doom metal. This is their debut album.

Featuring members of Desolate Shrine and Dark Buddha Rising, this is dark and gloomy death/doom that boasts four colossal tracks lasting 50 minutes in total. Continue reading

Slow – V – Oceans (Review)

SlowSlow is a solo funeral doom band from Belgium and this is his fifth album.

From the man involved with bands such as We All Die (Laughing), COAG, Merda Mundi, Cult of Erinyes, and many others, this is 57 minutes of atmospheric funeral doom that’s come to drag you down into a bleak, watery abyss. Continue reading

Abbotoir – MCMXV (Review)

AbbotoirSometimes music can seem more than just music – sometimes it seems like a force of nature. MCMXV is like that. Only two tracks, but over 50 minutes of music. Heavy, colossal, doom. This is the début album by this Irish doom band. Their first release was an EP (XLI) which whet the appetite nicely and this album follows hot on the heels of that.

Their style of doom is a filthy, dirgy, primal one. Primarily slow, (obviously), but not afraid to mix it up now and again in true sludge fashion. Indeed; both songs have their faster moments, but even these are covered in grime and filth, and the atmosphere steadfastly remains one of decay and neglect, further enhanced by the effects in the background of the primary instruments.

This is an album that will only improve with time. The repetitive nature of some of the dirgy riffs burrows into your subconscious and refuses to leave. A most welcome, if rotten, earworm; loudly insisting that you return for more foetid delights in the dank recesses of the Abbotoir.

With this release Abbotoir have proved that they are not one-(bong)-hit wonders and instead are capable of carving a niche for themselves in the doom scene. And I, for one, hope they continue to do so far some time to come.

Bismuth – The Eternal Marshes (Review)

BismuthThis is a little something for all those who worship at the altar of sloooooow. Almost a UK version of Burning Witch/Khanate; the basic template should be familiar to anyone into this kind of doom, although Bismuth inject enough of  their own personal brand of misery and woe into the music to differentiate it from their peers.

This is a one-track release lasting 16 minutes and every single minute is a hymn to distortion and doom. Bass, drums and tortured screeching.

Slow and agonised; the music drags itself into the darkest corner of your forgotten fears and festers, waiting patiently and growing all of the time. Occasional screams of growing pains punctuate this hidden time bomb of malignancy like something trying to escape, but ultimately realising the futility.

This is doom. This is slow, bass-heavy, doom. There is nothing else.

Monolithe – Interlude Second (Review)

MonolitheAnother solid release from Monolithe. They really do play some exceptional doom. After recently getting their Monolithe II album I knew this was going to be good and I was not disappointed.

If you have not encountered Monolithe before they play crawling, mysterious Doom with an emphasis on the heavy.

This is only a two-track EP ‘interlude’ between their main releases, but there is still over 36 minutes of music here – all of it of a high quality and well worth a purchase. Monolithe are not a band for everyone – the repetitive drone-esque heaviness will just be more than some people can stomach. Never-the-less; devotees of all things slow will find a goldmine of doom to be found in their work, and this EP is fitting as a good introduction to the band and as preparation for the doom-a-thons that are their albums.

Interested? Have a listen and then hop over to Bandcamp to get it – it’s currently only €0.50 and an absolute steal at that price.

Eye of Solitude – Sui Caedere (Review)

Eye of SolitudeUK-based Eye of Solitude play slow, dirge-y funeral doom. Imagine a band like Esoteric only with some Paradise Lost-esque riffs/melodies, topped off with some very nice vocals.  Ahh yes; the vocals. The vocals are absolutely relentless – pure, deep, utterly uncompromising growls. The vocals fit the music perfectly and almost act as another instrument used to flatten the listener with their oppressive aural assault.

As well as the slow, crawling, very-heavy nature of the music, Eye of Solitude display a welcome grasp of songcraft and melody. This means that the songs don’t get boring or outstay their welcome, as well as having an emotional content which enhances the general feeling of the album to the point where even on the first listen you know that this is going to be a ‘grower’ of an album; the more you listen to it the better it gets.

Interspersed with all of the heaviness are also some quieter, more introspective moments that allow the listener a brief respite before being steamrollered once more by the crushing doom on offer here. It all works very well. “A Note to Say Farewell” is a great example of this.

This is the kind of album I can just sit back; turn up loud; and just let the soundscapes wash over me. The sheer feeling of the tracks on display here; the combination of songwriting, melody and atmosphere that gives the album something special and definitely makes it stand out from its peers.

Highly recommended. If you even vaguely like this genre of music then you will enjoy this band.