Bismuth – The Slow Dying of the Great Barrier Reef (Review)

Bismuth - The Slow Dying of the Great Barrier ReefThis is the second album from UK doom/drone band Bismuth.

Ever since first hearing The Eternal Marshes I’ve been a fan of what Bismuth do. Over the years they’ve continued to develop their bass-drum-synth-low-end-heavy-doom-assault-on-the-senses approach to music. Every release essentially sees them rising to new heights of both extremity and nuance, and this has now culminated in this new colossal album. Continue reading

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Black Tar Prophet – Deafen (Review)

Black Tar ProphetBlack Tar Prophet are an instrumental Sludge/Doom band from the US. This is their second album.

This is heavy. This is slow. This is DOOM! This is good.

The band live up to their name, with Sludgy, bass-heavy riffs leading the way in a tsunami of sound designed to crush the senses and render the mind inert. Sonic sensory overload.

Destructively slow riffs meet with, (sometimes), up-tempo sections and pummelling drum rhythms to create forceful and energetic songs that soak up the raw essence of what it means to be Sludge, even when only playing for a short time; Judgement Whore  is only 1:40 in length for example, but is pure filthy Doom greatness.

Imagine a mix of Eyehategod, Bismuth, Ghold and Khanate; now remove the vocals, remove the guitars and distil the essence into, (mostly), short songs. Black Tar Prophet are here. All hail.

Bismuth – The Eternal Marshes (Review)

BismuthThis is a little something for all those who worship at the altar of sloooooow. Almost a UK version of Burning Witch/Khanate; the basic template should be familiar to anyone into this kind of doom, although Bismuth inject enough of  their own personal brand of misery and woe into the music to differentiate it from their peers.

This is a one-track release lasting 16 minutes and every single minute is a hymn to distortion and doom. Bass, drums and tortured screeching.

Slow and agonised; the music drags itself into the darkest corner of your forgotten fears and festers, waiting patiently and growing all of the time. Occasional screams of growing pains punctuate this hidden time bomb of malignancy like something trying to escape, but ultimately realising the futility.

This is doom. This is slow, bass-heavy, doom. There is nothing else.