Convictors – Envoys of Extinction (Review)

ConvictorsThis is the début album of Death Metallers Convictors who are from Germany.

Convictors play Old-School 90’s-style Death Metal with a crushing production and raging beats.

The melodic leads and heavy riffs work with the solid drumming to create enjoyable songs. Blast beats pound and guitars rage; Convictors play song-based Death Metal where a lot of thought has clearly gone into the formulation of the songs and the riffs.

Songs like Angel of Impurity show that the band can slam and groove their way with the best of them. It’s also a good example of their bassist being heard too, which is always a nice treat.

There really are some solid riffs here. It all sounds huge and as mentioned previously the band are not without songwriting talent. The end result is an enjoyable Death Metal album that shows how the style easily blows away lesser forms of music.

The vocals are deeper-than-deep growls that seem to blank out everything else when they’re present. He has the kind of voice that sends posers and wannabes running for safety.

I’ve really enjoyed this album. Check them out and see what you think.

For fans of Cannibal Corpse, Morbid Angel, Tortharry, Verdict, Supreme Lord, Six Feet Under, Immolation, Internal Bleeding, etc., etc. – loud, heavy Death Metal!

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Verdict – The Meaning of Isolation (Review)

VerdictVerdict are a veteran German band who play Thrash Metal with some added Death Metal. The Meaning of Isolation is their fourth full-length release.

They have a crisp, professional sound that allows the Thrashy riffs to glitter and shine. The nine tracks are steeped in Germanic Thrash and are savage and immediate. Imagine Kreator given a Death Metal makeover then add in a few elements of New-School Thrash and you’ll have an idea of Verdict’s mode of attack.

Snarling vocals take the centre-stage and sound as if a caged, rabid dog has been given the microphone. These are backed up on occasion with deeper growls that reinforce the hostile nature of the band.

The drummer keeps up a good pace, but the band also know when to lock into a good groove. Killing Fantasies is a good example of this; the band has a good groovy bounce for the first minute or so before going into full-on Thrash mode for the next section.

This is a well-written Metal album that manages to capture the essence of what Thrash is about while bringing it up to date with some more modern, aggressive influences; all the time retaining authenticity and never coming across as commercial or sanitised.

A recommended listen.