Coma Cluster Void – Thoughts from a Stone (Review)

Coma Cluster VoidThis is the second album from Coma Cluster Void, an experimental avant-garde metal band with an international background.

Coma Cluster Void’s debut album Mind Cemeteries was 45 minutes of dissonant, cryptic, esoteric death metal that took a few spins to fully appreciate, but when you did conquer its challenging extreme metal worldview, it yielded many rewards and treasures.

The band are now back with this latest EP; 22 minutes of experimental, technical, avant-garde death metal, steeped in dissonance and atypical riffs and seemingly born in an alternate dimension. As I stated on my review of Mind Cemeteries – this is not your typical death metal release, not at all. In fact, on Thoughts from a Stone the band have pushed the envelope even further, with a variety of different styles, moods, and textures explored across the playing time.

With experimental guests and added instrumentation, (including 10-string guitar, cello, and violin), as well as even greater variety in vocals, this EP demonstrates that Coma Cluster Void are willing to do whatever it takes to fully explore their creative horizons. It’s great to hear a band totally allow themselves the freedom to do whatever they like, and on Thoughts from a Stone it has paid off handsomely.

Replete with all manner of interesting and unusual ideas, wrapped in dissonant riffs, angular beats, and strange, barely human vocals, the tracks mutate and warp into and out of each other with one sinuous, disturbing flow. Although it’s divided into six tracks, this is essentially one long song; my only real complaint about this release is that I would have preferred it if they’d actually have released it as such, instead of chopping it up. Still, a minor quibble in the grand scheme of things.

Bewildering and chaotic, but with its own internal logic, Thoughts from a Stone needs to be heard and absorbed repeatedly before you can truly make sense of it. As it’s been sliced up, it’s best take it in one complete listening too – playing the tracks randomly on shuffle, for example, would simply make it even harder to digest. Like the band’s full-length though, once you get to know the twisting, confusing avenues that the music steers you down, there’s ample rewards to be had.

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