The Last Ten Seconds of Life – The Violent Sound (Review)

The Last Ten Seconds of LifeThe Last Ten Seconds of Life are a US metal band, this is their third album.

What happens when deathcore runs out of room to expand within its restrictive genre confines and needs to spread its wings into a wider world? The Violent Sound is what happens.

Mixing the heavy, low-end rumble of deathcore with a slice of nu-metal, The Last Ten Seconds of Life have a sound that is largely one of their own in 2016.

Nu-metal may be a slightly lazy tag that still carries negative connotations to some, but not only did it see some pioneering bands embracing a more innovative take on heavy music, (which in turn inspired a slew of copycats), but it was also overwhelmingly popular. Relating this back to The Last Ten Seconds of Life; nu-metal is a useful tag to describe this urge to branch out that the band clearly have. If you take the familiar elements of deathcore and combine them with aspects of Mushroomhead, American Headcharge and even a touch of Marilyn Manson, then you’ll have a good idea of how The Violent Sound, er, sounds.

Keyboards and electronics enhance the tracks here and there, adding another layer to the band’s delivery. Deep growls and aggressive shouts share airtime with clean vocals that are darker than those of your typical radio-friendly metalcore band. Both of these things further differentiate The Last Ten Seconds of Life’s sound from a lot of their peers, as it would have been so easy for the band to water down their deathcore with the more commercial metalcore aspects that we’re now overly familiar with. Instead, they’ve taken on aspects of the darker side of nu-metal’s experimentation, and I have to say it’s worked a treat.

The Violent Sound really does stand relatively alone in 2016. The style that the band have carved for themselves is infectious, enjoyable and highly engaging. It’s the sound of a band that want more for themselves, deepening the musical offer that they have and allowing them to experiment and explore their potential, without sacrificing their core heaviness and aggression. The result is 42 minutes of very pleasing modern heavy music.

With songs that are well-written and know what they’re doing, this is an album that could easily see The Last ten Seconds of Life going places.

Hugely enjoyable, hugely heavy and just huge overall. A must listen for fans of dynamic, modern heavy music.

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